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Nostoc (Cyanophyceae)

 

 

Nostoc sp. from Goose Pond, NH USA
Colony of trichomes embedded in mucopolysaccharide sheath, from an autumn bloom on Goose Pond, Canaan NH. Image by James F. Haney, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH USA.  

 

 

Nostoc sp. from Goose Pond, NH USA

Colony of trichomes embedded in mucopolysaccharide sheath, from an autumn bloom on Goose Pond, Canaan NH. Image by James F. Haney, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH USA.

 

 

 

Nostoc sp. colonies ("balls") viewed by a tadpole.
Image by David A. Dalton, Reed College, Portland, OR USA posted online .

 

 

 

 

Nostoc sp.

Colony of trichomes embedded in mucopolysaccharide sheath, from an autumn bloom on Goose Pond, Canaan NH. Image by James F. Haney, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH USA .

 

 

 

Nostoc sp.

Colony of trichomes embedded in mucopolysaccharide sheath, from an autumn bloom on Goose Pond, Canaan NH. Image by James F. Haney, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH USA .

  

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme colonies floating after forming gas vesicles and becoming buoyant. Note 'milky' yellow to green appearance.  Photograph by Bregieta (Brea) Arvidson 2017.

 

 

 

Nostoc sp. floating on surface of Pyramid Lake near Paradox, NY USA. Colonies are filled with gas vacuoles giving them a milky-green appearance. Photograph by Sue Pierce posted online.

 

 

 

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme.
Image by Stephen Sharnoff , posted online .

 

 

 

 

Nostoc sp. cf. pruniforme

Bright green Nostoc cf. pruniforme colonies, probably ~ 1 cm diameter, rich in chlorophyll a. Sold as food. Posted online.

 

 

 

 

Nostoc sp. cf. pruniforme

Orange colonies of Nostoc cf. pruniforme with dominance of carotenoids. Commercially sold as a food -- Image by Perubiotech .

 

 

 

 

Nostoc cf pruniforme
Images of colonies ("balls") as posted in Wikipedia .

 

 

 

 

Nostoc cf pruniforme. from a stone-covered private drive in the United Kingdom
Photograph by Paul James on Microbewiki posted online .

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme colonies (1 2 cm) in their natural setting at Goose Pond, Maine (lat 43.561, lon -70.863), 28 Sep 2014.  Underwater photograph by Dennis Roberge, Shapleigh ME USA .

 

 

 

 

  Nostoc pruniforme colonies (1 2 cm) in their natural setting at Goose Pond, Maine (lat 43.561, lon -70.863).  Underwater photograph by Dennis Roberge, Shapleigh ME USA, 28 Sep 2014

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme colonies (1 2 cm) in their natural setting at Goose Pond, Maine (lat 43.561, lon -70.863).  Underwater photograph by Dennis Roberge, Shapleigh ME USA, 28 Sep 2014

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme colonies (1 2 cm) in their natural setting at Goose Pond, Maine
(lat 43.561, lon -70.863), 28 Sep 2014
Underwater photograph by Dennis Roberge, Shapleigh ME USA

 

 

 

Large Nostoc pruniforme colony ~3 cm diameter
Photograph in 'visuals unlimited' posted
online

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme - largest Nostoc colony on record (22 cm diam., 2.6 kg wet wt) – almost bowling ball size!

Dodds, W.K., D.A. Gudder and D. Mollenhauer  1995.  The ecology of Nostoc.  Journal of Phycology 31:2-18.

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme spherical colony, from a lake in New Hampshire, USA

   

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme spherical colonies, from a lake in New Hampshire, USA

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme at an early stage of colony formation (several colonies), following formation of relatively amorphous semi-filaments in photograph above.  Similar source and history.  Photograph by Matthew Larson, University of New Hampshire

 

 

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme lacking peripheral border and releasing trichomes, from a lake in New Hampshire, USA

 

 

 

Nostoc as symbiont of the host Blasia pusilla, a liverwort.  Nostoc chamber’ in the liverwort supports growth of Nostoc and penetrates the colony with clear cells in the form a a branching tree with a single trunk, thus providing a large surface area undoubtedly for absorbing photosynthate.  Sketch by Coker (1903).

Coker, W.C.  1903.  Selected Notes.  II.  Liverworts.  Botanical Gazette 36(3):225-230.

 

 

 

Nostoc life cycle, both free-living and endobiotic, not all species use all parts of the cycle.
Sketch by Paulsrud (2001)

Paulsrud, P.  2001.  The Nostoc symbiont of lichens.  Diversity, specificity and cellular modifications.  PhD Dissertation, Faculty of Science and Technology, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, Uppsala. (online)

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme trichomes (no sheath yet) recently escaped (two days ago) from colonies placed in a 38 L aquarium, formed a thin-layer association visible in patches on the water surface (neuston).  Individual heterocysts were also in the surface layer.  Apparently the trichomes ejected their intercalary heterocysts, thereby forming two trichomes by fractionation, and then formed terminal heterocysts, some visible in photograph.  Colonies were collected at Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA, 4 Oct. 2014

 

 

 

Nostoc trichomes extracted from the inside of the outer 'cover' of a Nostoc pruniforme colony that have formed terminal heterocysts and have no intercalary heterocysts.  The colony was collected at Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA, 4 Oct. 2014.

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme from Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA illustrating 'islands' of trichomes attached to the outer 'skin' of a colony (~ x40).

   

 

 

Trichomes and free heterocysts recently liberated from a Nostoc pruniforme colony and fractured on either side of the previously intercalaray heterocysts.  Collected at Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA.

 

 

 

Trichomes liberated from a Nostoc pruniforme colony that have formed terminal heterocysts.  Collected at Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA.

 

 

Terminal heterocyst on a trichome inside the sheath of a Nostoc pruniforme colony.  Apparently half of the cells have broken off the opposite side of the previously intercalary heterocyst.  Collected at Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA.

  

 

 

Unknown 'volcanic outcropping' attached to a fraction of sheath from a Nostoc pruniforme colony collected in Goose Pond, Shapleigh ME USA

 

 

 

 

Fractured sheath from a Nostoc pruniforme colony from Goose Pond, ME USA.  When disrupted the sheath fractures in elongated strips

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strips from a fractured Nostoc pruniforme colony sheath, collected in the benthos of Goose Pond, Shapleigh Maine, USA

 

 

 

 

Nostoc commune in a damp terrestrial habitat
Photograph posted
online by the German Wikipedia

 

 

Nostoc zetterstedtii
Photograph from Mollenhauer et al. 2000

Mollenhauer, D., R. Bengtsson, E-A Lindstrom and M. Oslash  2000.  Macroscopic cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc:  a neglected and endangered constituent of European inland aquatic biodiversity.  European Journal of Phycology 34:349-360.

 

 

 

Nostoc pruniforme stage in life cycle following escape of trichomes from filament, with amorphous pseudofilament formation including extracellular gel deposition, prior to forming a spherical gell colony.  Collected from the benthos (depth ~1.2 m) of Goose Pone, Shapleigh, ME USA in October 2014, kept in a 75 L aquarium next to an east facing lab window, photographed in December 2014. Photograph by Matt Larson, University of New Hampshire

 

 

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme released trichomes, from a lake in New Hampshire, USA

 

 

 

Nostoc cf. pruniforme released trichomes, from a lake in New Hampshire, USA

 

 

 

Nostoc fuscescens Fritsch 1912
Modified from sketch by
Seaburg et al (1979) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

Seaburg, K.G., B.C. Parker, G.W. Prescott & L.A. Whitford  1979  The algae of Southern Victoria land, Antarctica. Bibl Lichenol, Vol 46, J Cramer, Vaduz

 

 

 

 

 

Nostoc piscinale Kuetzing 1843
Modified from sketch by Seaburg et al (1979) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

Seaburg, K.G., B.C. Parker, G.W. Prescott & L.A. Whitford  1979  The algae of Southern Victoria land, Antarctica. Bibl Lichenol, Vol 46, J Cramer, Vaduz

 

 

 

Nostoc commune Vauch. ex B. & F.
Modified from sketch by Zaneveld  (1988) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

Zaneveld, J.S.  1988.  The cyanophyta of the Ross Sea Islands and coastal Victoria Land, Antarctica. Koeltz Scientific Books, Koenigstein.

 

 

 

 

 

Nostoc sp.
Modified from sketch by Broady  (1979) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

Broady, P.A.  1979.  A preliminary survey of the terrestrial algae of the Antarctic Peninsula and South Georgia. Br Antarct Surv Bull 48: 47-70

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nostoc punctiforme

Modified from sketch by Broady  (1979) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

Broady, P.A.  1979.  A preliminary survey of the terrestrial algae of the Antarctic Peninsula and South Georgia. Br Antarct Surv Bull 48: 47-70.

 

 

 

  Nostoc microscopicum Carmichael in Hook 1833.  Modified from sketch by Seaburg et al (1979) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

Seaburg, K.G., B.C. Parker, G.W. Prescott & L.A. Whitford  1979  The algae of Southern Victoria land, Antarctica. Bibl Lichenol, Vol 46, J Cramer, Vaduz

 

 

 

 

 

Nostoc muscorum.  Modified from sketch by Pankow et al. (1991) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

 

 

 

Nostoc commune.  Modified from sketch by Zaneveld (1988) from the collection of Manfred Bölter, University of Kiel, DE

 

Zaneveld, J.S.  1988.  The cyanophyta of the Ross Sea Islands and coastal Victoria Land, Antarctica. Koeltz Scientific Books, Koenigstein.

 

Nostoc pruniforme colonies blown to lee shore of Lake Millen, Washington NH, USA
on 14 Oct 2020.  Photography:  
Martha Robertson.

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